30 years ago a typical house had 20 windows, averaging about 1/2 of a square metre each, and predominantly 5mm glass. This was before the days of tall ceilings, floor to ceiling windows, common use of bi-fold doors, and architectural glass. Based on these numbers the average house had 10 square metres of glass, 0.05 of a cubic metre of glass, and a total weight of 126kgs of glass.

A typical house of today has an average of 41 glass items, averaging ¾ of a square metre each, double glazed with an average glass thickness of 5mm x 2. Based on these numbers the average house has 31 square metres of glass, 0.31of a cubic metre of glass, and a total weight of 784kgs of glass.

The total weight of glass has increased by over 6 times.

More interesting is the true volume of the DGUs. The glass items have increased from 5mm to 24mm in thickness. In terms of capacity this is a 5 fold increase. Therefore the actual volume of glass items in the new house is actually 0.738 of a cubic metre. More than half of the capacity is air (or gas).
The total capacity of glass has increased by 15 times.

What this means for glass transporters is a change from focusing on the weight carrying of the vehicle to the volume carrying. The traditional small ledges on the outsides of trucks are no longer sufficient, and internal storage has become the norm.
Glass factories are finding they're running out of space. It's not surprising. No wonder we make an increasing number of concertina and swing racks to go into existing glass factories to create more space.

The figures used are estimates based on discussions with glaziers and glass industry staff. If you have some factual figures on the growth for your business please let me know.